Consumers left behind in bottle deposit law changes

0

Legislation passed by the Iowa House and Senate – SF2378 – will significantly reduce where you can trade in your empty bottles and cans. Without a convenient place to redeem your empty containers, grocers, convenience stores and other retailers will steal your nickels. When you have no place to return your empty containers, the store that charged you a nickel deposit steals that nickel.

Ask the governor to veto SF2378 – through her E-mail or call his office at 515-281-5211.

Legislation passed by the House and Senate will allow grocery stores, convenience stores and other stores that sell beer, liquor and soft drinks to their customers not to repurchase empty containers if any of the following applies:

  1. Dealer holds a Food Establishment License to prepare or serve food, has a Certified Food Safety Officer as required by the US Food and Drug Administration Food Code.
  2. Dealer has entered into an agreement with an authorized Redemption Center to operate a Mobile Redemption System and provides adequate space, utilities, and internet connection to operate the Mobile Redemption System. Additionally, the Agreement may not require additional payment to the Dealer or Mobile Redemption System for providing the Services.
  3. The dealership’s business is in a county with a population greater than 30,000 and within 10 miles of a redemption center or if the dealership’s location is in a county with a population of 30,000 or less and within 24 kilometer(s) from redemption centre.

The consumer is the one who is harmed by this legislation. Although there was great fanfare from lawmakers supporting these changes claiming the legislation was the result of a compromise, it should be noted that the consumer was left out of the compromise.

The bottle deposit legislation passed by the Chamber raises several concerns:

  1. Removing empty cans and bottle returns from grocery stores and convenience stores will make refunds extremely inconvenient. Approximately 1,700 locations are currently required to redeem empties. There are only 60 redemption centers in the state.
  2. Proponents of the legislation hope there will be incentives for mobile units to be purchased and installed in the parking lots of existing grocery stores and convenience stores. This may happen in some locations, but it may not be a convenient alternative for customers.
  3. There is less than one redemption center per county. This clearly won’t be a practical option for repurchasing empty containers for many Iowans.
  4. Redemption centers may not be open at times and days that are convenient for customers.
  5. Although the legislation increases the processing fees paid to redemption centers from 1 cent to 3 cents, this may not be enough to encourage the construction of new redemption centers. Which means returning empties will be inconvenient for customers.
  6. It’s more than a matter of convenience – it’s a matter of cost in terms of gas to return empty containers to a facility 30 miles round trip from the store where the soft drink, beer or alcohol were purchased.

Who loses when buying back bottles is inconvenient?

  1. Consumers – who will have their nickels stolen. The system worked by the customer paying a nickel for the can or bottle when purchased, then collecting the nickel when the vacuum returned.
  2. The environment – just look at the paper and plastic in our ditches. If it’s not practical to turn over the voids, they will also end up in the ditch.
  3. This is only the first step in completely dismantling the bottle deposit law.

The bottle deposit law worked and does not need the changes made in SF2378.

Since its inception in 1978, Iowans have benefited from the bottle deposit law. It should not be disassembled. We are all used to paying a nickel deposit on plastic, glass and metal soda and alcohol containers, which is returned to us when we return the empty bottles to the store.

The Bottle Deposit Act diverts containers from landfill to recycled products. And recycled bottles and cans provide a clean, well-sorted valuable product. Also, by encouraging recycling, less trash is strewn across the state. The Bottle Deposit Act even provides pocket money to those who collect discarded bottles and cans. The bottle deposit law provides jobs for Iowans who are involved in the recovery process. Iowa’s bottle deposit law has been a success.

The bottle deposit law is popular.

In fact, Iowans supports expanding the bottle deposit law to include other beverage containers. Iowans are universally supportive of Iowa’s bottle deposit law. A 2022 poll in Iowans, conducted by Selzer & Co. shows that:

  • 84% of Iowans say the recycling law is good for the state.
  • 80% said the state should keep the law as is or expand it to include more eligible container types and more outlets where empty containers can be returned. Of these, 61% said they would extend the bottle deposit law, while 19% said they supported keeping the law as it is.
  • 86% support adding locations that will accept empty containers.
  • 72% support increasing fees at stores and redemption centers to cover program costs.
  • 71% support adding more types of containers to the bottle deposit law.
  • 51% support increasing the deposit from 5 cents to 10 cents.

The Bottle Deposit Act diverts containers from landfill to recycled products.

Also, by encouraging recycling, less trash is strewn across the state.

  • According to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, 71% of beverage containers are recycled each year.
  • Buying back plastic, glass and metal soft drink and alcohol containers encourages keeping discarded containers out of roadside ditches and public spaces.
  • Returning beverage containers reduces the amount of waste that needs to be buried in landfills.
  • Using returned containers to create new products consumes less energy than using virgin raw materials.
  • The Bottle Deposit Act even provides pocket money to those who collect discarded bottles and cans.
  • The bottle deposit law provides jobs for 870 Iowans who are involved in the recovery process.

The bottle deposit was a success!

Ask the governor to veto SF2378 – through her E-mail or call his office at 515-281-5211.


Source link

Share.

Comments are closed.